GETTING STARTED RALLYING

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Getting Started

The easiest way to get started in Rally is to get involved in the rally community by finding your closest Rally Club. CARS Regional Links

Clubs across Canada organise events starting with the entry level navigational rallies right up to National Championship performance rally events. Getting involved in your local club lets you see what is going on, help out local teams, learn the sport from the inside, volunteer at the event, and – most importantly – get to know the rally community.

There is a wide range of events hosted by our rally clubs, and each one offers a unique challenge to the teams.

Navigational Rallies

also know as Time Speed Distance (TSD) Rallies, are navigational challenges where teams are given routes to follow and average speeds to maintain. While the target speeds are below the posted limit, the roads used still provide a challenge for both the driver and navigator. TSDs are often promoted as a gateway to performance rally, but the top-level competition can be really intense. These events take place on normal roads that are open to the public.

Requirements: First aid kits, emergency triangles and fire extinguishers are normally all that are required. Serious competitors will consider skid-plates, driving lights, rally computers (specific TSD computers are available), map lights and specialized tires.

Rally Schools

are a great way to learn the fundamentals and make yourself safer and faster. Schools are offered at various locations and can involve the use of a fully prepared school cars – as is the case with our partner Dirtfish Rally School – use of your own rally car, or in some cases your regular street car. Schools are available for all aspects of rally driving as well as co–driving. You can check with your local rally club for schools near you.

Requirements: Schools may have prerequisites for certain classes to ensure you have the basic knowledge to complete the training exercises. Most schools provide any safety equipment required during the course.

Rally Cross

events are excellent to get comfortable driving a car on loose surfaces. These events are typically held on open, flat, self contained areas with speeds kept relatively slow, and are normally safe. Cars will run the course one at a time, with the fastest times in the day coming out on top.

Requirements: Safety equipment is limited to a helmet meeting CARS standards for RallyCross. Car preparation is normally limited to removing loose items and making sure the car is mechanically sound. Again, at the top level competition can get serious and preparation will include lightening the car, improved suspension, specialized tires and race seats.

Rally Sprint

events are a stepping-stone to performance rallies and are made up of stages less than 5km in length with an average speed slower than 80km/h. These events take place on closed roads with only rally sprint traffic being allowed on the stages.

Requirements: Car safety and preparation rules match those of performance rally. Some driver equipment requirements are relaxed but CARS does recommend using all of the performance rally safety equipment if possible.

Performance Rally

events require specific licencing and full safety equipment as listed in the National Rally Regulations. These events are held on closed roads with the teams of a driver and co-driver are released at one-minute intervals from the start. While the fastest times on the competitive sections will generally win the event, there is also a navigational portion to Performance Rallies that requires teams to travel between stages and check in on time.

Requirements: Performance rally events require specific licencing, First Aid training, a medical certification, some experience on loose surface (TSDs, Rally Cross, Schools) and full safety equipment as listed in the National Rally Regulations. The safety equipment includes Helmet, head and neck restraint, race suit, race seats, race harnesses, roll cage, fire extinguishers, and first aid kits.

Rally Test Days

are perfect events to learn your car, test set-ups, try co-drivers, and usually get as much seat time as you want. Test days are run on a closed stage road but don’t follow any set schedule or involve official timing.

Requirements: Car safety and preparation rules match those of performance rally. Some driver equipment requirements are relaxed but CARS does recommend using all of the performance rally safety equipment if possible.

Regional Championship Performance Rally

events are normally strongly contested and offer tight competition. The level of car preparation is generally modest in terms of performance enhancements, but the cars must meet all safety and class regulations. Total stage distance is less than you’ll find at a national and regional organisers tend to stay away from long stages.

There are four regional championships in Canada, the Eastern Canadian Rally Championship (ECRC), the Western Canada Rally Championship (WCRC), the Ontario Provincial Rally Championship (OPRC) and the Championnat de Rallye du Québec (CRQ).

National Championship Performance Rally

events require an enhanced competition license and bring the best in the country together to compete on the stages. Stage distances are longer and schedules can be more demanding and time consuming than regional events. This is the Canadian Rally Championship (CRC)

Requirements: To be eligible for a National Performance Rally License competitors must have successfully competed in two regional performance rally events and must apply for a National License.